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Murder in Wallasey in the 19th Century

THE MURDER AT WALLASEY.

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 16 February 1867

 

The funeral of Hugh M'Keown, the one-armed marine store dealer, who was brutally murdered in broad daylight at Poulton, on Tuesday last, took place on Saturday in the Roman Catholic part of Flaybrick-hill Cemetery. The police bave not yet succeeded in tracing the murderer. The inquest on the body was resumed on Monday, at the Liscard Court-house, before Mr. Henry Churton, the deputy coroner. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown. Major Chambres, one of the jury, suggested that as the only reward so far offered for the apprehension of the murderer was £20, offered by the son of the deceased (a carter to whom tbe deceased had willed £90), larger sum shoutd be offered. —The coroner said he would immediately communicate with the Home Secretary on the subject, and he might state that he had never yet been refused similar application. Major Chambres said that if £100 or £500 was necessary for the purpose he had no doubt it could be raised without difficulty in the district. young Irishman named William Gannon was brought at the County Magistrates-court, Birkenhead, on Tuesday, charged by Redmond, officer the Liverpool police force, with attempting to defraud the Great Western Railway Company. It appeared that eleven o'clock on Monday evening the prisoner went on board the ferry boat passing between Monks' Ferry and Liverpool, without paying his toll. On being asked for it, he said he had paid, and walked away. Some gentlemen on board pointed out the prisoner as answering the description of the person who was last seen in company with the man who was murdered on Tuesday week, near the Great Float, and in consequence he was given into custody. The prisoner said he had been working under the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board, near the Great Float; but not giving satisfactory account as how he happened to be on his way from Chester Monday night, he was remanded to Thursday, when he was discharged, there being evidence against him, and he did not all agree with the description of the roan last seen company with the deceased.

Liscard Court House poison bottle 19th century

THE STRANGE CHARGE OF WIFE MURDER AT WALLASEY.

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Thursday 03 July 1884

 

At the Wallasey Petty Sessions yesterday, Thomas Edmond Morris was charged, on remand, with the wilful murder of his wife by poisoning. Inspector Soots, of the Criminal Investigation Department, now stated that the Treasury had made a complete investigation of the matter, and had arrived at the conclusion that there was no evidence to support the charge. The chairman of the bench said the conclusion which the Treasury had come to was exactly what the magistrates thought when the case was before them, and that was that there was no evidence on they could convict. They had great sympathy with Mr. Morris for the hardships he had endured; but all they could do was to dismiss the case.

THE YORKSHIRE POST, THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1884. THE STRANGE CHARGE OF WIFE MURDER AT WALLASEY. BOSTON HORSE SHOW. At the Wallasey (Birkenhead) Petty Sessions yesterday, Thomas Morris was charged on remand the wilful murder of his wife by poisoning. Inspector Roots, of the Criminal Investigation Department, now stated that the Treasury had made complete investigation the matter, and had arrived the conclusion that there was evidence to support the charge. The Chairman said the conclusion which the Treasury had come was exactly what the magistrates thought when the case was before them. They great sympathy with Mr Moms for the hardships he had endured, but all they could do was to dismiss the case. This show was continued at Boston, in beautiful weather, yesterday. The attendance was large. The following are the principal awards: —Horse, shown in saddle, 14 hands and not exceeding hands 1 inch —1, J. Robinson, Hull; 2, J. Laue. Pony, shown in single harness, 13 hands 2 inches and under—l. A. Robinson; 2, H. Barn', jun. Hunter, shown in saddle, calculated to carry 14 stones -I, A. J. Brown; 2, T. Wilson. Horse, shown in single harness, over hands 3 inches-1, G. A. Gibson ;2, J. Lane. Pony, shown in saddle, under 14 hands—l, W. Pope; H. Barry. Horse, shown in siugle harness, 13 hands 2 inches, and not exceeding 14 hands 3 inches—l, W. Ridlington; 2, J. Lane. Horse judged the cleverest jumper, 1"» hands 2 inches and over —1, Hemingway; G. Brown and E. Waller, equal. Horse judged the cleverest jumper, under hands 2 inches—l, W. Dodsworth E. Waller.

19th century cabinet maker

GIRL TELEGRAPHIST'S DEATH.

Gloucester Citizen - Wednesday 30 November 1927

 

Man Charged with Murder at Wallasey.

 

PRISONERS ALLEGED STATEMENT. Wallasey, Wednesday. A dramatic statement alleged to have been made George Graham (54), a cabinet maker, of Wallasey, was read when he was charged on remand at Wallasey Police Court with the murder of Kathleen Cowburn (15), probationer telegraphist. The girl died from coal gas poisoning on November 14th, after being found unconscious in Graham's workshop. Mr. B. G. Segwell, for the prosecution, said that about 8.90 on the 14th prisoner knocked at the back door Cowburn's house, and Mrs. Cow burn, in evidence, would say that he was agitated condition. The girl died in hospital at 9.15. Nothing was seen of Graham until his return home at 11.0 o'clock. He was arrested at 12.30. Among the things in the workshop firegrate were pills, capsules ,and pill boxes—some partly charred some unburnt—together with a part of bill-bead made out to Graham. ALLEGED VOLUNTARY STATEMENT. In a voluntary statement to the police Graham said: may as well tell you it has come to me now. We were going to take gas both of us. We were both the bench. remember it now. She was frightened to go home. 1 have told you the trut'n. I uon't believe in telling lies. We were both going to do it. In my right senses I would not have done it. I have been worried in the shop. My wife has been ill. It has preyed on mind." A letter found in the girl's mackintosh read: I recieved your letter. Just happened to be in or someone would have opened it. You should send addressed to Parkstreet. Enclosed is five shillings. Send more next week. With love, G.G. Tear this up when read."